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Metaphorical models - Bipolar Disorders

Having bipolar disorder is like having a loose emotional switch. Flick the switch up and mood becomes elevated, flick down and mood becomes depressed. The switch tends to flick from north pole to south, or between black and white, without any shades of grey. It is as if there is an absence or a diminution of any inhibitory process to prevent the emotional momentum from building in a particular direction.

(Mood stabiliser) medication is like using glue to stiffen the switch, discouraging the switch from flicking to one pole, and discouraging mood instability.

The Feet-need -to-be-brought -d...

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When a Bex and a lie down isn't enough

Life is never just plain sailing, but in times of emotional crisis you don't have to cope alone, writes Angie Kelly.

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Psychiatric Emergencies - Lecture

The following is derived from lectures that I have given in Jan 2006 intended for the teaching of trainee psychiatrists. It is a combination of the author's views and published guidelines based on best practice principles derived from studies and expert opinions.

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Metaphorical models - Anxiety Disorders

Introduction

Anxiety is adaptive. It drives the athlete, motivating them to compete, to train, to perform and to win. It drives the student to attend lectures, to read boring textbooks, to study and to pass. They may be anxious about failure, about humiliation, about losing self-esteem, losing confidence, losing momentum, about letting others down, or merely anxious to chase success. There are numerous fears that might trigger anxiety that is adaptive as it helps to drive some behaviour that is deemed adaptive for the individual.

Panic attacks

Anxiety may also be triggered by danger, by t...

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Metaphorical models - Psychotic Disorders

Psychosis is terminology of the medical model. It refers to symptoms (feelings, thoughts and behaviour) that doctors / mental health professionals objectively perceive in the patient. To the patient, a different perspective is experienced. Telling a psychotic patient that the voice they are hearing is not real or the belief that a conspiracy is occurring around them is not real is like trying to convince someone that the chair they are sitting on does not really exist,

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